The Latin Mass Is Important Because Most Catholics Are Roman Rite

I am re-posting the different Rites in the Catholic Christian Church that are in union with the Universal Catholic Church.  It is important information because it has to do with the Latin Mass and all the other Roman Sacraments and prayers.  I have highlighted the numbers of non-Roman Rite Catholics to show how few people belong to those rites.

Here is a summary of the Western and Eastern Rites from ewtn.com.

St._Peter's_Basilica_Rome_Italy“Western Rites and Churches

Immediately subject to the Bishop of Rome, the Supreme Pontiff, who exercises his authority over the liturgy through the Congregation for Divine Worship and the Discipline of the Sacraments.


ROMAN/LATIN FAMILY OF LITURGICAL RITES

The Church of Rome is the Primatial See of the world and one of the five Patriarchal Sees of the early Church (Rome, Constantinople, Alexandria, Antioch and Jerusalem). Founded by St. Peter in 42 AD it was consecrated by the blood of Sts. Peter and Paul during the persecution of Nero (63–67 AD). It has maintained a continual existence since then and is the source of a family of Rites in the West. Considerable scholarship (such as that of Fr. Louis Boyer in Eucharist) suggests the close affinity of the Roman Rite proper with the Jewish prayers of the synagogue, which also accompanied the Temple sacrifices. While the origin of the current Rite, even in the reform of Vatican II, can be traced directly only to the 4th century, these connections point to an ancient apostolic tradition brought to that city that was decidedly Jewish in origin.

After the Council of Trent it was necessary to consolidate liturgical doctrine and practice in the face of the Reformation. Thus, Pope St. Pius V imposed the Rite of Rome on the Latin Church (that subject to him in his capacity as Patriarch of the West), allowing only smaller Western Rites with hundreds of years of history to remain. Younger Rites of particular dioceses or regions ceased to exist.

As a consequence of the Second Vatican Council’s Dogmatic Constitution on the Sacred Liturgy, Pope Paul VI undertook a reform of the Mass of the Roman Rite, promulgating a revised rite with the Missal of 1970. This Missal has since been modified twice (1975 and 2002). Mass celebrated in accordance with this missal is the Ordinary Form of the Roman Rite.

At the time of the revised Missal’s promulgation in 1970 almost all Catholics assumed that the previous rite, that of the Missal of 1962, had been abolished. By decision of the Supreme Pontiff Benedict XVI this general assumption has been declared false and the right of Latin Rite priests to celebrate Mass according to the former missal has been affirmed (Apostolic Letter Summorum Pontificum, 7 July 2007). Mass celebrated in accordance with the Missal of 1962 constitutes the Extraordinary Form of the Roman Rite.

• Roman – The overwhelming majority of Latin Catholics and of Catholics in general.
– Ordinary Form of the Roman RiteMass celebrated in accordance with the Missale Romanum of 1970, promulgated by Pope Paul VI, currently in its third edition (2002). The vernacular editions of this Missal, as well as the rites of the other sacraments, are translated from the Latin typical editions revised after the Second Vatican Council.
– Extraordinary Form of the Roman RiteMass celebrated in accordance with the Missale Romanum of 1962, promulgated by Blessed Pope John XXIII. The other sacraments are celebrated according to the Roman Ritual in force at the time of the Second Vatican Council. The Extraordinary Form is most notable for being almost entirely in Latin. In addition to institutes which have the faculty to celebrate the Extraordinary Form routinely, such as the Priestly Fraternity of St. Peter and the Institute of Christ the King Sovereign Priest, any Latin Rite priest may now offer the Mass and other sacraments in accordance with norms of Summorum Pontificum.
– Anglican Use. Since the 1980s the Holy See has granted some former Anglican and Episcopal clergy converting with their parishes the faculty of celebrating the sacramental rites according to Anglican forms, doctrinally corrected.
• Mozarabic – The Rite of the Iberian peninsula (Spain and Portugal) known from at least the 6th century, but probably with roots to the original evangelization. Beginning in the 11th century it was generally replaced by the Roman Rite, although it has remained the Rite of the Cathedral of the Archdiocese of Toledo, Spain, and six parishes which sought permission to adhere to it. Its celebration today is generally semi–private.
• Ambrosian – The Rite of the Archdiocese of Milan, Italy, thought to be of early origin and probably consolidated, but not originated, by St. Ambrose. Pope Paul VI was from this Roman Rite. It continues to be celebrated in Milan, though not by all parishes.
• Bragan – Rite of the Archdiocese of Braga, the Primatial See of Portugal, it derives from the 12th century or earlier. It continues to be of occasional use.
• Dominican – Rite of the Order of Friars Preacher (OP), founded by St. Dominic in 1215.
• Carmelite – Rite of the Order of Carmel, whose modern foundation was by St. Berthold c.1154.
• Carthusian – Rite of the Carthusian Order founded by St. Bruno in 1084.


Byzantine Catholic ChurchEastern Rites and Churches

The Eastern Catholic Churches have their own hierarchy, system of governance (synods) and general law, the Code of Canons for the Eastern Churches. The Supreme Pontiff exercises his primacy over them through the Congregation for the Eastern Churches.

ANTIOCHIAN FAMILY OF LITURGICAL RITES
The Church of Antioch in Syria (the ancient Roman Province of Syria) is considered an apostolic See by virtue of having been founded by St. Peter. It was one of the ancient centers of the Church, as the New Testament attests, and is the source of a family of similar Rites using the ancient Syriac language (the Semitic dialect used in Jesus’ time and better known as Aramaic). Its Liturgy is attributed to St. James and the Church of Jerusalem.

1. WEST SYRIAC
• Maronite – Never separated from Rome. Maronite Patriarch of Antioch. The liturgical language  is Aramaic. The 3 million Maronites are found in Lebanon (origin), Cyprus, Egypt, Syria, Israel, Canada, US, Mexico, Brazil, Argentina and Australia.
• Syriac – Syriac Catholics who returned to Rome in 1781 from the monophysite heresy. Syriac Patriarch of Antioch. The 110,000 Syriac Catholics are found in Syria, Lebanon, Iraq, Egypt, Canada and the US.
• Malankarese – Catholics from the South of India evangelized by St. Thomas, uses the West Syriac liturgy. Reunited with Rome in 1930. Liturgical languages today are West Syriac and Malayalam. The 350,000 Malankarese Catholics are found in India and North America.

2. EAST SYRIAC
• Chaldean – Babylonian Catholics returned to Rome in 1692 from the Nestorian heresy. Patriarch of Babylon of the Chaldeans. Liturgical languages are Syriac and Arabic. The 310,000 Chaldean Catholics are found in Iraq, Iran, Syria, Lebanon, Egypt, Turkey and the US.
• Syro–Malabarese – Catholics from Southern India using the East Syriac liturgy. Returned to Rome in the 16th century from the Nestorian heresy. Liturgical languages are Syriac and Malayalam. Over 3 million Syro–Malabarese Catholics can be found in the state of Kerela, in SW India.


Bishop Meletiev sings Pontifical High Mass in the Russian Byzantine rite at FatimaBYZANTINE FAMILY OF LITURGICAL RITES
The Church of Constantinople became the political and religious center of the eastern Roman Empire after the Emperor Constantine built a new capital there (324–330) on the site of the ancient town of Byzantium. Constantinople developed its own liturgical rite from the Liturgy of St. James, in one form as modified by St. Basil, and in a more commonly used form, as modified by St. John Chrysostom. After 1054, except for brief periods of reunion, most Byzantine Christians have not been in communion with Rome. They make up the Orthodox Churches of the East, whose titular head is the Patriarch of Constantinople. The Orthodox Churches are mostly auto–cephalous, meaning self–headed, united to each other by communion with Constantinople, which exercises no real authority over them. They are typically divided into Churches along nation lines. Those that have returned to communion with the Holy See are represented among the Eastern Churches and Rites of the Catholic Church.

1. ARMENIAN
Considered either its own Rite or an older version of the Byzantine. Its exact form is not used by any other Byzantine Rite. It is composed of Catholics from the first people to convert as a nation, the Armenians (N.E. of  Turkey), and who returned to Rome at the time of the Crusades. Patriarch of Cilicia of the Armenians. The liturgical language is classical Armenian. The 350,000 Armenian Catholics are found in Armenia, Syria, Iran, Iraq, Lebanon, Turkey, Egypt, Greece, Ukraine, France, Romania, United States and Argentina. Most Armenians are Orthodox, not in union with Rome.

2. BYZANTINE
• Albanian – Albanian Christians, numbering only 1400 today, who resumed communion with Rome in 1628. Liturgical language is Albanian. Most Albanian Christians are Albanian Orthodox.
• Belarussian/Byelorussian – Unknown number of Belarussians who returned to Rome in the 17th century. The liturgical language is Old Slavonic. The faithful can be found in Belarus, as well as Europe, the Americas and Australia.
• Bulgarian – Bulgarians who returned to Rome in 1861. Liturgical language is Old Slavonic. The 20,000 faithful can be found in Bulgaria. Most Bulgarian Christians are Bulgarian Orthodox.
• Czech – Czech Catholics of Byzantine Rite organized into a jurisdiction in 1996.
• Krizevci – Croatian Catholics of Byzantine Rite who resumed communion with Rome in 1611. The liturgical language is Old Slavonic.  The 50,000 faithful can be found in Croatia and the Americas. Most Croatians are Roman (Rite) Catholics.
• Greek – Greek Christians who returned to Rome in 1829. The liturgical language is Greek. Only 2500 faithful in Greece, Asia Minor (Turkey) and Europe. Greek Christians are almost all Orthodox, whose Patriarch is the Orthodox Patriarch of Constantinople.
• Hungarian – Descendants of Ruthenians who returned to Rome in 1646. The liturgical languages are Greek, Hungarian and English. The 300,000 faithful are found in Hungary, Europe and the Americas.
• Italo–Albanian – Never separated from Rome, these 60,000 Byzantine Rite Catholics are found in Italy, Sicily and the Americas. The liturgical languages are Greek and Italo–Albanian.
• Melkite – Catholics from among those separated from Rome in Syria and Egypt who resumed Communion with Rome at the time of the Crusades. However, definitive union only came in the 18th century. Melkite Greek Patriarch of Damascus. Liturgical languages are Greek, Arabic, English, Portuguese and Spanish. The over 1 million Melkite Catholics can be found in Syria, Lebanon, Jordan, Israel, Canada, US, Mexico, Brazil, Venezuela, Argentina and Australia.
• Romanian – Romanians who returned to Rome in 1697. The liturgical language is Romanian. There are over 1 million Romanian Catholics in Romania, Europe and the Americas. Most Romanian Christians are Romanian Orthodox.
• Russian – Russians who returned to communion with Rome in 1905. The liturgical language is Old Slavonic. An unknown number of the faithful in Russia, China, the Americas and Australia. Most Russian Christians are Russian Orthodox, whose Patriarch is the Orthodox Patriarch of Moscow.
• Ruthenian – Catholics from among those separated from Rome in Russia, Hungary and Croatia who reunited with Rome in 1596 (Brest–Litovsk) and 1646 (Uzhorod).
• Slovak – Byzantine Rite Catholics of Slovakian origin numbering 225,000 and found in Slovakia and Canada.
• Ukrainian – Catholics from among those separated from Rome by the Greek Schism and reunited about 1595. Patriarch or Metropolitan of Lviv. Liturgical languages are Old Slavonic and the vernacular. The 5.5 million Ukrainian Catholics can be found in Ukraine, Poland, England, Germany, France, Canada, US, Brazil, Argentina and Australia. During the Soviet era Ukrainian Catholics were violently forced to join the Ukrainian Orthodox Church. Their hierarchy, which continued to exist outside the homeland, has since been re–established in Ukraine.


ALEXANDRIAN FAMILY OF LITURGICAL RITES
The Church of Alexandria in Egypt was one of the original centers of Christianity, since like Rome and Antioch it had a large Jewish population which was the initial object of apostolic evangelization. Its Liturgy is attributed to St. Mark the Evangelist, and shows the later influence of the Byzantine Liturgy, in addition to its unique elements.

• Coptic – Egyptian Catholics who returned to communion with Rome in 1741. The Patriarch of Alexandria leads the 200,000 faithful of this ritual Church spread throughout Egypt and the Near East.  The liturgical languages are Coptic (Egyptian) and Arabic. Most Copts are not Catholics.

• Ethiopian/Abyssinian – Ethiopian Coptic Christians who returned to Rome in 1846. The liturgical language is Geez. The 200,000 faithful are found in Ethiopia, Eritrea,  Somalia, and Jerusalem.”

There is a variety of Rites but most of the 1.2 Billion Catholics belong to the Roman Rite.  They are mostly in Europe and North, Central and South America, the Philippines, Australia, New Zealand and most parts of Africa and India.

547px-Exhumation_of_Saint_HubertExhumation_of_Saint_Hubert

For us traditional Catholics, we care about the sacredness being maintained in liturgy, Roman or Byzantine.  Most of the Byzantine Rites were not destroyed after Vatican II.  But since most Catholics are Roman Rite and we are one of those, we are here to restore the sacredness of the Roman Rite to the Holy Latin Mass and all the other Holy Latin Sacraments.

Ste. Chapelle 9Ste. Chapelle France

We are so blessed to rediscovering the great sacredness and beauty of the Holy Roman-Latin Rites of the Catholic Church and to be doing something to restore them back to their grandeur and holiness.

St. Felix Of Valois Nov. 20

Felix of ValoisSt. Felix, previously called Hugh, of the royal family of Valois in France, from his youth began to seek solitude from the desire for heavenly contemplation. When he was ordained priest, he withdrew to a hermitage, where he lived for some years with St. John of Matha. Then God told them both through an Angel’s message to go to Rome to obtain from Pope Innocent III, who had also been advised from heaven, the approbation of a new order for the redemption of captives. 3336Because of the white habit adorned with a cross in two colors which they had received from the Angel, the same pontiff gave this order the name of the Most Holy Trinity. They soon built the first house of the Order in the diocese of Meaux at a place called Cerfroi. There Felix received a great favor from the Blessed Virgin Mary: he saw her in the middle of the choir clothed in the habit of the Order with its cross. Full of merits, he died at an advanced age in the Lord in the year 1212.

Santa Muerte, Seeds Planted In Souls By Devil

Here is a comment left on my blog as to why these seeds are “planted” in the Santa Muerte idols. youngmansantamuerte1Photo Of Baptized Catholic Converted To The Sancta Muerte from Newsthatmatters 

Father, this is very interesting–and even more so disturbing. I was a practicing pagan before my reversion to the Faith. The significance of the seed from my understanding and experience is this.

When a (practicing, religious) pagan wants something, they begin their “magickal workings.” This is seen as “planting a seed” using the so-called “powers that be.” I know now that those powers are the powers of the prince and power of the air. The pagan will come back to their work on a regular basis, symbolized as cultivating the seed. The “seed” then grows into the thing desired. Parenthetical note, you may very well receive the thing you desired, but it never lasts very long, and something is always taken away from you greater than what you have received.

Seeing a seed inside this statue to a demon is very telling. The creator of the statue wanted to “plant a seed” in the life of the devotee. Literally. The seeds within the statues were most likely cursed in some way pertaining to the blooming of the demon in the devotee’s life. At least, that was what struck me as the purpose.

slide_293319_2365033_freePicture Of Candles to Santa Muerte From Huff Post

Jesus also talks about seeds of the Holy Gospel.

 Hear ye: Behold, the sower went out to sow.  And whilst he sowed, some fell by the way side, and the birds of the air came and ate it up.  And other some fell upon stony ground, where it had not much earth; and it shot up immediately, because it had no depth of earth.

And when the sun was risen, it was scorched; and because it had no root, it withered away.  And some fell among thorns; and the thorns grew up, and choked it, and it yielded no fruit.  And some fell upon good ground; and brought forth fruit that grew up, and increased and yielded, one thirty, another sixty, and another a hundred.  And he said: He that hath ears to hear, let him hear.  And when he was alone, the twelve that were with him asked him the parable.

And he said to them: To you it is given to know the mystery of the kingdom of God: but to them that are without, all things are done in parables: That seeing they may see, and not perceive; and hearing they may hear, and not understand: lest at any time they should be converted, and their sins should be forgiven them.  And he saith to them: Are you ignorant of this parable? and how shall you know all parables?  He that soweth, soweth the word.  And these are they by the way side, where the word is sown, and as soon as they have heard, immediately Satan cometh and taketh away the word that was sown in their hearts.

 And these likewise are they that are sown on the stony ground: who when they have heard the word, immediately receive it with joy.  And they have no root in themselves, but are only for a time: and then when tribulation and persecution ariseth for the word they are presently scandalized.  And others there are who are sown among thorns: these are they that hear the word,  And the cares of the world, and the deceitfulness of riches, and the lusts after other things entering in choke the word, and it is made fruitless.  And these are they who are sown upon the good ground, who hear the word, and receive it, and yield fruit, the one thirty, another sixty, and another a hundred.  Mark 4:3-20

Paschaltide 3Jesus also talks about the weed seeds planted by the devil.

Another parable he proposed to them, saying: The kingdom of heaven is likened to a man that sowed good seeds in his field.  But while men were asleep, his enemy came and oversowed cockle among the wheat and went his way.

And when the blade was sprung up, and had brought forth fruit, then appeared also the cockle.  And the servants of the goodman of the house coming said to him: Sir, didst thou not sow good seed in thy field? whence then hath it cockle?  And he said to them: An enemy hath done this. And the servants said to him: Wilt thou that we go and gather it up? And he said: No, lest perhaps gathering up the cockle, you root up the wheat also together with it.  Suffer both to grow until the harvest, and in the time of the harvest I will say to the reapers: Gather up first the cockle, and bind it into bundles to burn, but the wheat gather ye into my barn.  Matt. 13:24-30

Anti-Catholic blog, “News That Matters”, mis-interprets the Catholic symbol for death and skulls as an idol we adore.  peter1Death On Top Of Tomb Or Skull In A Catholic Church In Rome Is To Remind Us Of Death

We only adore The Triune God, Father, Son and Holy Spirit.  We do not adore the Mary, the Angels or the saints.  That would be idolatry.

St. Queen Elizabeth Of Hungry Nov. 19

Elizabeth of Hungary detail_MASTER of Sainte GuduleFrom her childhood St. Elizabeth, daughter of Andrew, king of Hungary, began to fear God; and she grew in holiness as she grew in age. When she was married to Ludwig, Landgrave of Hesse and Thuringia, she devoted herself no less to the service of God than to the welfare of her husband. She was constant in prayer and in the works of mercy, zealously serving widows, orphans, the sick and the needy, for whom she built a fine hospital. When her husband died, she put on a coarse garment and, in order to serve God more freely, entered the Order of Penitents of St. Francis, where she shone most especially with the virtues of patience and humility. Elizabeth of Hungary_SIMONE MARTINIThese virtues she showed when she was despoiled of her possessions, driven from her home and abandoned by all. With unconquered spirit she endured insults, derision and detractions, even rejoicing greatly that she could suffer such things for God. Having passed her life most religiously in holy works, she fell asleep in the Lord. Famous for miracles, she was enrolled among the Saints by Gregory IX.

Traditional Catholic Wedding Vows, (And Other Vows), Are For Life

God will hold us accountable for every word that we have said.  I have heard that every word spoken by human beings, through out time, is actually somewhere in the atmosphere, (the sound waves created as these words are spoken)?

A_005_Wedding_PdeV1-31to2-6_01God, not only will ask us for a strict account of every word we have spoken, He will, even more so, hold us to our vows.  The popes, the cardinals, the bishops, the religious, the priests, the lay people who are consecrated, husbands and wives, have all made vows witnessed by the Church, and way more importantly, by God.

When the Synod tried to push Holy Communion for people who had already made wedding vows, and then have broken them by adultery in an other “marriage”, God knows all about their FIRST WEDDING VOWS.  God does not have amnesia.  Neither does everyone else that was present at the marriage, (the couple, the priest, the two witnesses and all the other family and friends whom attended the couples Sacramental marriage).

Countess+Caroline+de+Lannoy+Wedding+Prince+wDA8hkiXLWUlIt is not I, nor the Catholic Church, who made the Sacrament of Marriage holy and indissoluble.  It was none other than God Himself at the beginning of time and again was reiterated by Jesus.  “The two shall become one flesh.”  “Let no man divide what God has united.”

No synod, no pope, no married person, no priest, absolutely no one, can divide what God has already united.  Married people can break up, divorce and “marry” again.  Anyone in the Church that tries to say that this is alright and that they can receive Holy Communion while living in this adulterous relationship, is blaspheming.   And for those who do receive Holy Communion in an adulterous relationship, they are making a sacrilegious communion.  God truly does take all our words and vows a FACE VALUE.

Rosso_Marriage of Virgin_Florence, S. lorenzo_1523The traditional Ritual for the Celebration of Holy Matrimony begins with an introduction, an exhortation to couple, before they make their life long vows in Holy Matrimony.  The pope and synod bishops would have done well to have studied this before they tried to undermine Holy Marriage, (and the family which is held secure by the marriage vows).  Here is what it says:

“My dear friends: You are about to enter into a union which is most sacred and most serious.  It is most sacred, because established by God Himself; most serious, because it will bind you together for life in a relationship so close and so intimate, that it will profoundly influence your whole future.  That future, with its hopes and disappointments, its successes and its failures, its pleasures and its pains, its joys and its sorrows, is hidden from your eyes.  You know that these elements are mingled in every life, and are to be expected in your own.  And so not knowing what is before you, you take each other for  better or for worse, for richer or for poorer, in sickness and in health, until death.

 

Truly, then, these words are most serious.  It is a beautiful tribute to your undoubted faith in each other, that recognizing their full import, you are nevertheless, so willing and ready to pronounce them.  And because these words involve such solemn obligations, it is most fitting that you rest the security of your wedded life upon the great principle of self-sacrifice.  And so you begin your married life by the voluntary and complete surrender of your individual lives in the interest of that deeper and wider life which you are to have in common.  Henceforth you belong entirely to each other; you will be one in mind, one in heart, and one if affections.  And whatever sacrifices you may hereafter be required to make to preserve this common life, always make them generously.  Sacrifice is usually difficult and irksome.  Only love can make it easy; and perfect love can make it a joy.  We are willing to give in proportion as we love.  And when love is perfect the sacrifice is complete.  God so loved the world that He gave His Only begotten Son: and the Son so loved us that He gave Himself for our salvation.  “Greater love than this no man hath, that a man lay down his life for his friends.”

 

No greater blessing can come to your married life than pure conjugal love, loyal and true to the end.  May, then, this love with which you join your hands and hearts today, never fail, but grow deeper and stronger as the year go on.  And if true love and the unselfish spirit of perfect sacrifice guide your every action, you can expect the greatest measure of earthly happiness that may be allotted to man in this life.  The rest is in the hands of God.  Nor will God be wanting to your needs; He will pledge you the life-long support of His graces in the Holy Sacrament which you are now going to receive.”

 

1938 WEDDINGThank God for these traditional teachings on Catholic marriage contained in the traditional wedding ceremony.  Lex Orandi, Lex Credendi.  Marriage is extremely difficult.  Any false prayers or teaching undermines marriage and with very little effort, marriages begin to crumble.

I would like to ask all of you who are married and reading this blog to print up these instructions and discuss them with each other.  Remember that is says that God will be there with you throughout your married life till death.  That means in the good times and the bad, sickness and health, poverty and wealth.  We are so fortunate to be traditional Catholics and to have this divine wisdom to help us get through this “vale of tears” to heaven.

Words Of Instruction Before Traditional Catholic Wedding

Archuke Imre and Archduchess Kathleen | Spiering Photography“My dear friends: You are about to enter into a union which is most sacred and most serious.  It is most sacred, because established by God Himself; most serious, because it will bind you together for life in a relationship so close and so intimate, that it will profoundly influence your whole future.  That future, with its hopes and disappointments, its successes and its failures, its pleasures and its pains, its joys and its sorrows, is hidden from your eyes.  You know that these elements are mingled in every life, and are to be expected in your own.  And so not knowing what is before you, you take each other for  better or for worse, for richer or for poorer, in sickness and in health, until death.

Truly, then, these words are most serious.  It is a beautiful tribute to your undoubted faith in each other, that recognizing their full import, you are nevertheless, so willing and ready to pronounce them.  And because these words involve such solemn obligations, it is most fitting that you rest the security of your wedded life upon the great principle of self-sacrifice.  And so you begin your married life by the voluntary and complete surrender of your individual lives in the interest of that deeper and wider life which you are to have in common.  Henceforth you belong entirely to each other; you will be one in mind, one in heart, and one if affections.  And whatever sacrifices you may hereafter be required to make to preserve this common life, always make them generously.  Sacrifice is usually difficult and irksome.  Only love can make it easy; and perfect love can make it a joy.  We are willing to give in proportion as we love.  And when love is perfect the sacrifice is complete.  God so loved the world that He gave His Only begotten Son: and the Son so loved us that He gave Himself for our salvation.  “Greater love than this no man hath, that a man lay down his life for his friends.”

No greater blessing can come to your married life than pure conjugal love, loyal and true to the end.  May, then, this love with which you join your hands and hearts today, never fail, but grow deeper and stronger as the year go on.  And if true love and the unselfish spirit of perfect sacrifice guide your every action, you can expect the greatest measure of earthly happiness that may be allotted to man in this life.  The rest is in the hands of God.  Nor will God be wanting to your needs; He will pledge you the life-long support of His graces in the Holy Sacrament which you are now going to receive.”

Dedication Of Basilicas Of St. Peter And Paul Nov. 18

cropped-saint_peter_and_saint_paul_001

Among the holy places which have been held in honor among Christians from the beginning, one of the foremost has always been the Confession of St. Peter in the Vatican, made sacred by the tomb of the Prince of the Apostles. Here Constantine the Great is said to have prostrated himself on the ground and, with pick and shovel, to have marked but the place for the basilica, which he built at his own expense. This basilica was dedicated on November 18 by Pope St Sylvester. It was at that time that he decreed that henceforth altars were to be made only of stone. Eventually, having deteriorated with age this basilica was rebuilt from its foundations with greater magnificence. The loving care of several successive popes saw to the long task of rebuilding, and in 1626 Pope Urban VIII solemnly dedicated the new basilica on the anniversary of the original dedication. In the same way, the basilica of St. Paul on the Ostian Way was very richly built by Emperor Constantine and consecrated by St. Sylvester. Then, after it had been destroyed by a great fire, it was rebuilt more splendidly than before by the untiring devotion of four popes. And Pius IX, surrounded by a solemn assembly of bishops, consecrated it on the auspicious occasion of the definition of the dogma of the Immaculate Conception of the Blessed Virgin Mary.

St. Gregory Wonderworker Nov. 17

gregory_wonerworker2St. Gregory, bishop of Neocesarea in Pontus, was famous for his holiness and learning, but still most famous for his signs and miracles. These were so numerous and outstanding that he was called Thaumaturgus, the Wonderworker. St. Basil compares him to Moses, the Prophets and the Apostles. By his prayer he changed the location of a mountain which was obstructing the building of a church. He dried up a swamp which was a cause of discord between two brothers. When the river Lycus was destructively flooding the fields, he drove his staff into the bank, where it grew into a green tree; and he compelled the river never afterwards to go beyond that spot. He very frequently cast out demons from the images of idols and from the bodies of men, and did many other wonderful things by which innumerable men were drawn to the faith of Jesus Christ. Gregory_wonderworkHe also had the prophetic spirit of predicting future events. When he was about to depart this life, he asked how many unbelievers still remained in the city of Neocaesarea..When he was told that there were only seventeen, he thanked God and said, “There was just that number of believers when I became bishop.” His many writings, as well as his miracles, enlightened the Church of God.