Quick List Of Companies That Support Planned Murderhood 2015

th

38 Big Name Donors to Planned (Murderhood) Parenthood 2015.

  1. Adobe
  2. American Cancer Society
  3. American Express
  4. AT&T
  5. Avon
  6. Bank of America
  7. Bath & Body Works
  8. Ben & Jerry’s
  9. Clorox
  10. Converse
  11. Deutsche Bank
  12. Dockers
  13. Energizer
  14. Expedia
  15. ExxonMobil
  16. Fannie Mae
  17. Groupon
  18. Intuit
  19. Johnson & Johnson
  20. La Senza
  21. Levi Strauss
  22. Liberty Mutual
  23. Macy’s
  24. March of Dimes
  25. Microsoft
  26. Morgan Stanley
  27. Nike
  28. Oracle
  29. PepsiCo
  30. Pfizer
  31. Progressive
  32. Starbucks
  33. Susan G. Komen
  34. Tostitos
  35. Unilever
  36. United Way
  37. Verizon
  38. Wells Fargo

From dailysignal.com

abortion1

St. Lawrence Of Brindisi Saves Europe From Muslims 1601

In 1600, the sultan of Constantinople, Mohamed III (Mehmed), bragged that he would conquer Europe and use the altar of St. Peter’s Basilica as an animal trough for Turkish horses.  This sultan was already famous for having had his 19 brothers and half brothers executed to secure his power.  Over and over again, the Ottoman sultans kept attempting to conquer Catholic Europe.

14-lepanto-alvaro-de-bazan-300pxA few years before this, in 1571, Don Juan of Austria, with the help of God, Mary (The 15 decade Holy Rosary), the Catholic league and St. Pope Pius V, defeated the Ottomans at the Battle of Lepanto.217-Lepanto5

30 years later, Pope Clement VIII asked St. Lawrence of Brindisi, a Capuchin friar, to go to Germany to organize their princes into a crusade against the muslim attacks going on in Hungry.  He was very successful and organized the crucial resistance needed to save Europe.

hungary3.jpgAt this same time, Protestant Queen Elizabeth I, was courting the Ottoman turks to make an alliance with England.  She sent a jeweled musical organ to the sultan that had mechanical birds that sang as the organ was played.  It arrived on a large English gunship that the sultan studied and copied to use in his future battles to conquer more European Catholic territory.

246_LawrenceThe Battle of Stuhlweissenburg Hungry took place on October 11, 1601.  St. Lawrence led the battle on a horse carrying a large cross in front of the troops.  Again on October 14th of that same month, these Catholic forces, with St. Lawrence leading, had to fight the muslims in another battle and won.  

CrusaderChurchSt. Lawrence, when leading the troops in front into battle, was miraculously saved from all injury and claimed that all the success came from God and Mary.  The Catholic troops, numbering 18,000 men, way out numbered by 80,000 muslims.  The Turks, after suffering the loss of 30,000 men,  withdrew their army behind the Danube.

Many of the great saints, like St. Bernard of Clairvaux and St. King Louis the IX of France, organized and participated in the crusades.  St. Louis died on a crusade at Tunis North Africa on the 25th of August, 1270.

Whenever the crusades were led by holy people and all those envolved prayed and fasted, they had success.  Whenever they were unjust or doing evil sins, they lost.

life_louis_hiLet us pray to St. Lawrence of Brindisi, and all the other saints, to help all the Catholics (and others), who are at this very moment, suffering terribly under muslims all over the world.

St. Lawrence Of Brindisi July 21

St. Lorenzo da Brindisi

(Also: Lawrence, or Laurence, of Brindisi.)

Born at Brindisi in 1559; died at Lisbon on 22 July, 1619. In baptism he received the names of Julius Caesar. Guglielmo de Rossi — or Guglielmo Russi, according to a contemporary writer — was his father’s name; his mother was Elisabetta Masella. Both were excellent Christians. Of a precocious piety, Lorenzo gave early evidence of a religious vocation. The Conventuals of Brindisi were entrusted with his education. His progress in his studies was very rapid, and, when barely six, he had already given indication of his future successs in oratory. Consequently, he was always the one chosen to address, in accordance with the Italian custom, a short sermon to his compatriots on the Infant Jesus during the Christmas festivities. When he was twelve years of age his father died. He then pursued his studies at Venice with the clerics of St. Mark’s and under the supervision of one of his uncles. In 1575 he was received into the Order of Capuchins under the name of Brother Lorenzo, and, after his preofession, made his philosophical and theological studies at the University of Padua. Owing to his wonderful memory he mastered not only the principal European languages, but also most of the Semitic tongues. It was said he knew the entire original text of the Bible. Such a knowledge, in the eyes of many, could be accounted for only by supernatural assistance, and, during the process of beatification, the examiners of the saint’s writings rendered the following judgment: “Vere inter sanctos Ecclesiae doctores adnumerari potest.”

Such unusual talents, added to a rare virtue, fitted Brother Lorenzo for the most diverse missions. When still a deacon he preached the Lenten sermons in Venice, and his success was so great that he was called successively to all the principal cities of the peninsula. Subsequently, thanks to his numerous journeys, he was enabled to evangelize at different periods most of the countries of Europe. The sermons he left fill no less than eight folio volumes. He adopted the method of preaching in favour with the great Franciscan missionaries, or rather with apostolic workers of all times, who, aiming primarily to reach men’s hearts and convert them, always adapt their style of discourse to the spiritual needs of their hearers. Brother Lorenzo held successively all the offices of his order. From 1596 to 1602 he had, as general definitor, to fix his residence in Rome. Clement VIII assigned him the task of instructing the Jews; thanks to his knowledge of Hebrew and his powerful reasoning, he brought a great number of them to recognize the truth of the Christian religion. His saintliness, combined with his great kindliness, completed the preparing of the way for the grace of conversion. His success in Rome caused him to be called to several other cities, where he also baptized numerous Jews. At the same time he was commissioned to establish houses of his order in Germany and Austria. Amid the great difficulties created by the heretics he founded the convents of Vienna, Prague, and Graz, the nuclei of three provinces. At the chapter of 1602 he was elected vicar-general. (At that time the Order of Capuchins, which had broken away from the Observants in 1528 and had an independent constitution, gave its first superior the title of vicar-general only. It was not until 1618 that Pope Paul V changed it to that of minister general). The very year of his election the new superior began the visitation of the provinces. Milan, Paris, Marseilles, Spain, received him in turn. As his coming was preceded by a great reputation for holiness, the people flocked to hear him preach and to receive his blessing. His administration characterized by wise firmness and fatherly tenderness, was of great benefit to the order. At the Chapter of 1605 he refused to undertake for a second term the government of his brethren, but until his death he was the best adviser of his successors.

It was on the occasion of the foundation of the convent of Prague (1601) that St. Lorenzo was named chaplain of the Imperial army, then about to march against the Turks. The victory of Lepanto (1571) had only temporarily checked the Moslem invasion, and several battles were still necessary to secure the final triumph of the Christian armies. Mohammed III had, since his accession (1595), conquered a large part of Hungary. The emperor, determined to prevent a further advance, sent Lorenzo of Brindisi as deputy to the German princes to obtain their cooperation. They responded to his appeal, and moreover the Duke of Mercœur, Governor of Brittany, joined the imperial army, of which he received the effective command. The attack on Albe-Royal (now Stulweissenburg) was then contemplated. To pit 18,000 men against 80,000 Turks was a daring undertaking and the generals, hesitating to attempt it, appealed to Lorenzo for advice. Holding himself responsible for victory, he communicated to the entire army in a glowing speech the ardour and confidence with which he was himself animated. As his feebleness prevented him from marching, he mounted on horseback and, crucifix in hand, took the lead of the army, which he drew irresistibly after him. Three other Capuchins were also in the ranks of the army. Although the most exposed to danger, Lorenzo was not wounded, which was universally regarded as due to a miraculous protection. The city was finally taken, and the Turks lost 30,000 men. As however they still exceeded in numbers the Christian army, they formed their lines anew, and a few days later another battle was fought. It always the chaplain who was at the head of the army. “Forward!” he cried, showing them the crucifix, “Victory is ours.” The Turks were again defeated, and the honour of this double victory was attributed by the general and the entire army to Lorenzo.

Having resigned his office of vicar-general in 1605, he was sent by the pope to evangelize Germany. He here confirmed the faith of the Catholics, brought back a great number to the practice of virtue, and converted many heretics. In controversies his vast learning always gave him the advantage, and, once he had won the minds of his hearers, his saintliness and numerous miracles completed their conversion. To protect the Faith more efficaciously in their states, the Catholic princes of Germany formed the alliance called the “Catholic League”. Emperor Rudolph sent Lorenzo to Philip III of Spain to persuade him to join the League. Having discharged this mission successfully, the saintly ambassador received a double mandate by virtue of which he was to represent the interests of the pope and of Madrid at the court of Maximilian of Bavaria, head of the League. He was thus, much against his wishes, compelled to settle in Munich near Maximilian. Besides being nuncio and ambassador, Lorenzo was also commissary general of his order for the provinces of Tyrol and Bavaria, and spiritual director of the Bavarian army. He was also chosen as arbitrator in the dispute which arose between the princes, and it was in fulfillment of this rtle that, at the request of the emperor, he restored harmony between the Duke of Mantua and a German nobleman. In addition to all these occupations he undertook, with the assistance of several Capuchins, a missionary campaign throughout Germany, and for eight months travelled in Bavaria, Saxony, and the Palatinate.

Amid so many various undertakings Lorenzo found time for the practices of personal sanctification. And it is perhaps the greatest marvel of his life to have combined with duties so manifold anunusually intense inner life. In the practice of the religious virtues St. Lorenzo equals the greatest saints. He had to a high degree the gift of contemplation, and very rarely celebrated Holy Mass without falling into ecstasies. After the Holy Sacrifice, his great devotion was the Rosary and the Office of the Blessed Virgin. As in the case of St. Francis of Assisi, there was something poetical about his piety, which often burst forth into canticles to the Blessed Virgin. It was in Mary’s name that he worked his miracles, and his favourite blessing was: “Nos cum prole pia benedicat Virgo Maria.” Having withdrawn to the monastery of Caserta in 1618, Lorenzo was hoping to enjoy a few days of seclusion, when he was requested by the leading men of Naples to go to Spain and apprise Philip III of the conduct of Viceroy Ossuna. In spite of many obstacles raised by the latter, the saint sailed from Genoa and carried out his mission successfully. But the fatigues of the journey exhausted his feeble strength. He was unable to travel homeward, and after a few days of great suffering died at Lisbon in the native land of St. Anthony (22 July, 1619), as he had predicted when he set out on his journey. He was buried in the cemetery of the Poor Clares of Villafranca.

The process of beatification, several times interrupted by various circumstances, was concluded in 1783. The canonization took place on 8 December, 1881. With St. Anthony, St. Bonaventure, and Blessed John Duns Scotus, he is a Doctor of the Franciscan Order.

The known writings of St. Lorenzo of Brindisi comprise eight volumes of sermons, two didactic treatises on oratory, a commentary on Genesis, another on Ezechiel, and three volumes of religious polemics. Most of his sermons are written in Italian, the other works being in Latin. The three volumes of controversies have notes in Greek and Hebrew. [Note: In 1959 Pope John XXIII proclaimed St. Lorenzo da Brindisi a Doctor of the Universal Church. His feast is kept on 6 July.]

 

‘Catholic’ Countries, Since Vatican II, Pass Evil Laws

We see, more and more evil laws, that allow abortion and homosexual ‘marriage’, being passed and enforced in what used to be Catholic countries like Europe and South American.  In some parts of Mexico they have now passed these laws too.

PF_15.06.26_gayMarriageMap-640x500No matter how popular these laws are, they go completely against God’s laws.  These laws have been passed with the help of some ‘Catholic’ and ‘christian’ bishops, priests and people.   Some support these laws because they go along with their own homosexual life. Others support these laws because they have mis-directed compassion for pregnant women, (who do not want their pregnancy) or in sympathy for those who suffer from same sex attraction.  They see these people as being oppressed and their ‘social justice Catholicism’ demands equality for all these ‘situations’.

In the map above, you notice clearly that the islamic countries do not allow laws that go against Allah’s laws.  Russia, too, does not support the homosexual agenda.

Countries That Allow Homosexual ‘marriage’

Argentina (2010) England / Wales (2013) Ireland (2015) Portugal (2010) United States (2015)
Belgium (2003) Finland (2015) Luxembourg (2014) Scotland (2014) Uruguay (2013)
Brazil (2013) France (2013) The Netherlands (2000) South Africa (2006)
Canada (2005) Greenland (2015) New Zealand (2013) Spain (2005)
Denmark (2012) Iceland (2010) Norway (2009) Sweden (2009)

Countries Where homosexual ‘marriage’ is Legal in Some Jurisdictions

Mexico (2009)

‘In 2015, the Mexican Supreme Court issued a ruling making it much easier for gay and lesbian couples to wed. The decision gave same-sex couples the right to seek a court injunction against state laws banning gay marriage; although it did not technically legalize same-sex unions nationwide, it was a major step in that direction. Mexico’s Supreme Court also issued a ruling in favor of same-sex marriage in 2010, saying that same-sex marriages performed in Mexico City were valid and that they must be accepted throughout the country (Mexico City had legalized gay marriage in December 2009). Since 2011, the southern Mexican state of Quintana Roo also has allowed gay marriages. In 2014, the congress of the northern state of Coahuila approved same-sex marriage, and in 2015, neighboring Chihuahua followed suit.’  Pew Research Center, Religion & Public Life

Our country is in danger from all the sexual deviances that are being allowed in the armed forces too.  How can a military be strong when it allows homosexual sex.  But it is not only this sin that is making it weak.  I hear over and over again about the rampant promiscuity of military personnel, (adultery), pornography, masturbation, use of prostitutes and couples co-habitating.

When any nation goes against God’s laws, it becomes weak.  That is what happened before the fall of the Roman Empire.  There was a lot of orgies and homosexual sex in the Roman society and military.  The Barbarians were true men who easily wiped out the sexually weak men.  Go against God and nature and you end up with debauchery, corruption, defeat and death.

childmaryMary, Mother Of Life, (Jesus Christ), Pray for us.

It is interesting that, where the evil laws were passed to legally allow the mass murder of babies in their mother’s wombs, these laws preceded the passing of laws for homosexuals unions and ‘marriage’.

We traditional Catholics love everyone who has same sex attraction.  But we will never condone or support any sexual activity or laws that go against God’s laws.  We love and respect God.  From our respect and love of God, we respect others and we obey Him.  But we will never condone evil sins.  Sin is still sin, no matter how many people say it is not sin.

We are so blessed to be traditional Catholics and to know that God is love.  We know that His laws are laws of love for our well being and the well being of society we live in.

St. Jerome Emilian July 20

St. Jerome Emiliani 01St. Jerome Emiliani

Founder of the Order of Somascha; b. at Venice, 1481; d. at Somascha, 8 Feb., 1537; feast, 20 July; son of Angelo Emiliani (popularly called Miani) and of Eleonore Mauroceni, joined the army, and in 1508 defended Castelnuovo against the League of Cambray. Taken prisoner and miraculously liberated, he made a pilgrimage to the shrine of Our Lady of Treviso, in fulfillment of a vow. He was then appointed podestà of Castelnuovo, but after a short time returned to Venice to supervise the education of his nephews. All his spare time was devoted to the study of theology and to works of charity. After his ordination to the priesthood in 1518, the hospitals and the hovels of the poor were his favourite resorts. In the year of plague and famine (1528), he seemed to be everywhere, and showed his zeal especially for the orphans, whose number had so greatly increased. He rented a house for them near the church of St. Rose and, with the assistance of some pious laymen, ministered to their wants. To his charge was also committed the hospital for incurables, founded by St. Cajetan. In 1531 he went to Verona and induced the citizens to build a hospital; at Brescia he erected an orphanage, at Bergamo one for boys and another for girls. Here also he founded the first home for fallen women who wished to do penance. St. Jerome Emiliani 02Two priests, Alessandro Besuzio and Agostino Bariso, now joined him in his labours of charity, and in 1532 Jerome founded a religious society, placing the motherhouse at Somascha, a secluded hamlet between Milan and Bergamo. In the rule, Jerome puts down as the principal work of the community the care of orphans, poor, and sick, and demands that dwellings, food and clothing shall bear the mark of religious poverty. Jerome fell a martyr to his zeal; contracting a disease at Bergamo, he died at Somascha. He was beautified by Benedict XIV in 1747, and canonized by Clement XIII in 1767. The Office and Mass in his honour were approved eight years later. His biography was first written by Scipio Albani (1600); another by Andreas Stella (1605). The best was written by Aug. Tortora (Milan, 1620; in “Acta SS.”, Feb., II, 217 sq.).

After the death of Jerome his community was about to disband, but was kept together by Gambarana, who had been chosen superior. He obtained the approval (1540) of Paul III. In 1547 the members vainly sought affiliation with the Society of Jesus; then in 1547-1555 they were united with the Theatines. Pius IV (1563) approved the institution, and St. Pius V raised it to the dignity of a religious order, according to the Rule of St. Augustine, with solemn vows, the privileges of the mendicants, and exemption. In 1569 the first six members made their profession, and Gambarana was made first superior general. Great favour was shown to the order by St. Charles Borromeo, and he gave it the church of St. Mayeul at Pavia, from which church the order takes its official name “Clerici regulares S. Majoli Papiae congregationis Somaschae”. Later the education of youth was put into the programme of the order, and the colleges at Rome and Pavia became renowned. It spread into Austria and Switzerland, and before the great Revolution it had 119 houses in the four provinces of Rome, Lombardy, Venice, and France. At present the order has ten houses in Italy two of which are in Rome. The general resides in Rome at S. Girolamo della Carita.  1914 Catholic Encyclopedia