Prayer For Tradition Catholic Couples

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Married-couple-in-St-Peter-s-Square-October-2014Prayer For Tradition Catholic Couples

O merciful God!  We pray that we may always remember the sacredness of the wedding vows we made to you and to each other at the altar on the day of our Holy Sacrament of Marriage.  May we never forget the grave responsibility we have to maintain this sacredness throughout all our married life.

Everyday we beg you to give us your grace, so that we may continue to live our Sacrament of Marriage in faithfulness and love.

May our spirit of our mutual understanding and confidence grow deeper everyday and may no dispute or bad feelings ever come between us.

Merciful God, please give us Your blessing, so that we may be an ideal family, in Your eyes, and an excellent example to all those around us.

Finally, by Your mercy, consider us worthy to obtain eternal life; because it is only by Your grace that we can be holy and thus capable of reaching together our finally home, Heaven.

For all this we give thanks and glory, to the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit, now and forever, unto the ages of ages. Amen.

Catholic Exorcism And Re-Consecrating Creation # 5

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Jesus Christ took on human flesh, lived, taught, exorcized, suffered, died, rose from the dead and ascended to Heaven to destroy the devil’s kingdom and to establish His Kingdom on earth.  This Kingdom is His Mystical Body the Catholic Church.

The_Annunciation_He continues His salvific action through His Church by the Holy Sacraments, prayers and sacramentals.

‘The consecrations and blessings of the Church are extensions and radiations of the sacraments.  Their purpose, too, is Christ-life — building up of the Mystical Body into perfect stones to fit into the perfection of the Corner-Stone.  They continue the work of the sacraments or prepare for their reception.

Baptism is followed by the sacramentals of holy water, the Sunday morning Asperges, the blessing of infants, of children.

Confirmation is extended in the blessing of a school, of a library, an archive, an ambulance, or in those sacramentals which have a relation to the functioning of the Spirit;s Gifts.  The consecration of a monk or of a nun is patterned on Holy  Orders.

Matrimony is followed by the blessing of the bridal-chamber, the blessing of an expectant mother, the act of churching, the blessing of a home, and the profusion of blessings for material things which are used in family life.

The sacrament of penance is extended in the sacramentals of the Confiteor, absolutions, the papal blessing in the hour of a Christian departure from this world, and exorcisms.

Extreme Unction has for its radiations the blessings for the sick, the blessing of sick pilgrims, blessing of wine, medicine, linens, the blessing of a corpse, of a grave.

Thus the sacramentals with lead up to or continue the grace of the sacraments.  The various circumstances and conditions and material of life are consecrated, lest by their unsanctified state they prove to be obstacles in the way of sanctified humanity.’  The Roman Ritual Volume III pg. xii.

In the Holy Sacrament of the Eucharist or Holy Sacrifice of the Mass we find the highest degree of God working to re-consecrate and sanctify His creation.  At the Holy Mass the devil’s powers are destroyed and abundant graces are given to those who worthily participate in this Sacrament.

For my flesh is meat indeed: and my blood is drink indeed.  He that eateth my flesh, and drinketh my blood, abideth in me, and I in him.  John 6:56-57.Eucharist

Through the Holy Sacrament of the Eucharist, Christ dwells in us and we in Him.  He shares with us His Divinity so that, when we die, we live forever with Him.

He that eateth this bread, shall live for ever.  John 6:59b.

The Holy Mass and Eucharist strengthens us to fight the devil’s temptations and nourishes us to live holy lives.  We adore Jesus/God in the Holy Eucharist at Benediction and Holy Hours.  p_download_bodypart.asp

We are so blessed to be traditional Catholics and to have so many of these traditional exorcisms, sacramentals and blessings.  How terrible that so much of the use of sacramentals and blessings are no longer used in the new rites.

Fruits Of The Holy Spirit

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FRUITS OF THE HOLY GHOSTDublin_Christ_Church_Cathedral_Passage_to_Synod_Hall_Window_Fruit_of_the_Spirit_2012_09_26

Some writers extend this term to all the supernatural virtues, or rather to the acts of all these virtues, inasmuch as they are the results of the mysterious workings of the Holy Ghost in our souls by means of His grace. But, with St. Thomas, I-II, Q. lxx, a. 2, the word is ordinarily restricted to mean only those supernatural works that are done joyfully and with peace of soul. This is the sense in which most authorities apply the term to the list mentioned by St. Paul (Galatians 5:22-23): “But the fruit of the Spirit is, charity, joy, peace, patience, benignity, goodness, longanimity, mildness, faith, modesty, continency, chastity.” Moreover, there is no doubt that this list of twelve — three of the twelve are omitted in several Greek and Latin manuscripts — is not to be taken in a strictly limited sense, but, according to the rules of Scriptural language, as capable of being extended to include all acts of a similar character. 12-fruits-of-the-spiritThat is why the Angelic Doctor says: “Every virtuous act which man performs with pleasure is a fruit.” The fruits of the Holy Ghost are not habits, permanent qualities, but acts. They cannot, therefore, be confounded with the virtues and the gifts, from which they are distinguished as the effect is from its cause, or the stream from its source. The charity, patience, mildness, etc., of which the Apostle speaks in this passage, are not then the virtues themselves, but rather their acts or operations; for, however perfect the virtues may be, they cannot be considered as the ultimate effects of grace, being themselves intended, inasmuch as they are active principles, to produce something else, i.e. their acts. Further, in order that these acts may fully justify their metaphorical name of fruits, they must belong to that class which are performed with ease and pleasure; in other words, the difficulty involved in performing them must disappear in presence of the delight and satisfaction resulting from the good accomplished.  1914 Catholic Encyclopedia

Novena To The Holy Spirit 9th Day

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Holy Ghost_stained glass

O SANCTE SPIRITUS, qui sollemni Pentecostes die repente per dispertitas linguas tamquam ignis in Apostolos descendens, intra cenaculum congregatos, ita eorum mentes illuminasti, eorum animos incendisti, eorumque voluntates roborasti, ut inde per universum mundum proficiscerentur et ubicumque animose fidenterque Iesu Christi doctrinam annuntiarent, eamque suo profuso cruore obsignarent, renova, quaesumus, in animas quoque nostras prodigiales gratiae tuae effusiones. O HOLY SPIRIT, who on the solemn day of Pentecost didst suddenly descend upon the Apostles gathered in the Upper Room in parted tongues as it were of fire and didst so enlighten their minds, inflame their hearts, and strengthen their wills, that henceforth they went through the entire world and courageously and confidently proclaimed everywhere the teaching of Christ and sealed it with the shedding of their blood, renew, we beseech Thee, the wondrous outpouring of Thy grace in our hearts also.
Quanta mentes nostrae ignorantia laborant circa naturam gravitatemque divinarum veritatum, quae obiectum fidei efficiunt, sine qua salutem nemini sperare licet. Quot aberrationes a iusta terrenorum bonorum aestimatione, quae saepius animae ipsimet anteponuntur. Quam saepe corda nostra non, ut debent, Creatoris amore palpitant, sed ignobiliter creaturarum cupidine. Quam saepe falso humani iudicii respectu impellimur, cum debemus Iesu Christi praecepta palam profiteri, eaque sincere et cum rerum etiam iactura in vitae usum deducere. Quanta infirmitas in amplectenda ferendaque sereno libentique animo huius vitae cruce, quae christianum solummodo potest divini Magistri sui discipulum dignum efficere. How grievously our minds are afflicted with ignorance concerning the nature and dignity of those divine truths which form the object of faith, without which no man may hope for salvation. How far men go astray from a just estimation of earthly goods, which too often are put before the soul itself. How often our hearts do not beat with love of the Creator as they ought, but rather with an ignoble lust for creatures. How often are we led by a false respect for human judgment, when we ought to profess openly the precepts of Jesus Christ and to reduce them to action with a sincere heart and with, if need be, of our worldly substance. What weakness we manifest in embracing and carrying with a serene and willing heart the crosses of this life, which alone can make the Christian a worthy follower of his divine Master.
O Sancte Spiritus, mentes nostras illumina, corda nostra purifica, voluntatesque nostra redintegra; ita quidem ut infinitum animae nostrae pretium plane cognoscamus, itemque peritura huius mundi bona pro nihilo habeamus; ut Deum supra res omnes adamemus, eiusque amore proximos, quemadmodum nosmetipsos, diligamus; ut fidem nostram non modo palam demonstrare ne timeamus, sed de eadem potius gloriemur; ut denique non tantum res prosperas sed res etiam adversas quasi de manu Domini accipiamus, confisi prorsus omnia Eum in eorum bonum esse conversurum, qui erga Eum amore ferantur. Fac, quaesumus, ut nos, suavibus gratiae tuae impulsionibus constanter respondentes ac perseveranti animo operantes bonum, amplissimam sempiternae gloriae messem aliquando accipere mereamur. Amen. O Holy Spirit, enlighten our minds, cleanse our hearts, and give new strength to our wills; to such a degree, at least, that we may clearly recognize the value of our soul, and in a like manner, despise the perishable goods of this world; that we may love God above all things, and, for the love of Him, our neighbor as ourselves; that we may not only be free from fear in professing our faith publicly, but rather may glory in it; finally, that we may accept not only prosperity but also adversity as from the hand of the Lord, with all confidence that He will turn all things into good for those who lovingly tend towards Him. Grant, we beseech Thee, that we, by constantly answering the sweet impulses of Thy grace and doing that which is good with a persevering heart, may deserve one day to receive the rich reward of glory everlasting. Amen.

Gifts Of The Holy Spirit Or Holy Ghost

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  • gift1The gift of wisdom, by detaching us from the world, makes us relish and love only the things of heaven.gift2
  • The gift of understanding helps us to grasp the truths of religion as far as is necessary.gift3
  • The gift of counsel springs from supernatural prudence, and enables us to see and choose correctly what will help most to the glory of God and our own salvation.gift4
  • By the gift of fortitude we receive courage to overcome the obstacles and difficulties that arise in the practice of our religious duties.gift5
  • The gift of knowledge points out to us the path to follow and the dangers to avoid in order to reach heaven.gift6
  • The gift of piety, by inspiring us with a tender and filial confidence in God, makes us joyfully embrace all that pertains to His service.gift7
  • Lastly, the gift of fear fills us with a sovereign respect for God, and makes us dread, above all things, to offend Him.

Gifts Of The Holy Spirit

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GIFTS OF THE HOLY GHOSTSeven-Gifts-Holy-Spirit

By this term is meant attributing especially to one Divine Person perfections and exterior works which seem to us more clearly or more immediately to be connected with Him, when we consider His personal characteristics, but which in reality are common to the Three Persons. It is in this sense that we attribute to the Father the perfection of omnipotence, with its most striking manifestations, e.g. the Creation, because He is the principle of the two other Persons; to the Son we attribute wisdom and the works of wisdom, because He proceeds from the Father by the Intellect; to the Holy Ghost we attribute the operations of grace and the sanctification of souls, and in particular spiritual gifts and fruits, because He proceeds from the Father and the Son as Their mutual love and is called in Holy Writ the goodness and the charity of God.

The gifts of the Holy Ghost are of two kinds: the first are specially intended for the sanctification of the person who receives them; the second, more properly called charismata, are extraordinary favours granted for the help of another, favours, too, which do not sanctify by themselves, and may even be separated from sanctifying grace. Those of the first class are accounted seven in number, as enumerated by Isaias (11:2-3), where the prophet sees and describes them in the Messias. They are the gifts of wisdom, understanding, counsel, fortitude, knowledge, piety (godliness), and fear of the Lord.

  • The gift of wisdom, by detaching us from the world, makes us relish and love only the things of heaven.
  • The gift of understanding helps us to grasp the truths of religion as far as is necessary.
  • The gift of counsel springs from supernatural prudence, and enables us to see and choose correctly what will help most to the glory of God and our own salvation.
  • By the gift of fortitude we receive courage to overcome the obstacles and difficulties that arise in the practice of our religious duties.
  • The gift of knowledge points out to us the path to follow and the dangers to avoid in order to reach heaven.
  • The gift of piety, by inspiring us with a tender and filial confidence in God, makes us joyfully embrace all that pertains to His service.
  • Lastly, the gift of fear fills us with a sovereign respect for God, and makes us dread, above all things, to offend Him.

As to the inner nature of these gifts, theologians consider them to be supernatural and permanent qualities, which make us attentive to the voice of God, which render us susceptible to the workings of actual grace, which make us love the things of God, and, consequently, render us more obedient and docile to the inspirations of the Holy Ghost.

But how do they differ from the virtues? Some writers think they are not really distinct from them, that they are the virtues inasmuch as the latter are free gifts of God, and that they are identified essentially with grace, charity, and the virtues. That opinion has the particular merit of avoiding a multiplication of the entities infused into the soul. Other writers look upon the gifts as perfections of a higher order than the virtues; the latter, they say, dispose us to follow the impulse and guidance of reason; the former are functionally intended to render the will obedient and docile to the inspirations of the Holy Ghost. For the former opinion, see Bellevüe, “L’uvre du Saint-Esprit” (Paris, 1902), 99 sq.; and for the latter, see St. Thomas, I-II, Q. lxviii, a. 1, and Froget, “De l’habitation du Saint-Esprit dans les âmes justes” (Paris, 1900), 378 sq.

The gifts of the second class, or charismata, are known to us partly from St. Paul, and partly from the history of the primitive Church, in the bosom of which God plentifully bestowed them. Of these “manifestations of the Spirit”, “all these things [that] one and the same Spirit worketh, dividing to every one according as he will”, the Apostle speaks to us, particularly in I Corinthians 12:6-11; I Corinthians 12:28-31; and Romans 12:6-8.

In the first of these three passages we find nine charismata mentioned: the gift of speaking with wisdom, the gift of speaking with knowledge, faith, the grace of healing, the gift of miracles, the gift of prophecy, the gift of discerning spirits, the gift of tongues, the gift of interpreting speeches. To this list we must at least add, as being found in the other two passages indicated, the gift of government, the gift of helps, and perhaps what Paul calls distributio and misericordia. However, exegetes are not all agreed as to the number of the charismata, or the nature of each one of them; long ago, St. Chrysostom and St. Augustine had pointed out the obscurity of the question. Adhering to the most probable views on the subject, we may at once classify the charismata and explain the meaning of most of them as follows. They form four natural groups:

  • Two charismata which regard the teaching of Divine thingssermo sapientiæ, sermo scientiæ, the former relating to the exposition of the higher mysteries, the latter to the body of Christian truths.
  • Three charismata that lend support to this teaching: fides, gratia sanitatum, operatio virtutum. The faith here spoken of is faith in the sense used by Matthew 17:19: that which works wonders; so it is, as it were, a condition and a part of the two gifts mentioned with it.
  • Four charismata that served to edify, exhort, and encourage the faithful, and to confound the unbelieversprophetia, discretio spirituum, genera linguarum, interpretatio sermonum. These four seem to fall logically into two groups; for prophecy, which is essentially inspired pronouncement on different religious subjects, the declaration of the future being only of secondary import, finds its complement and, as it were, its check in the gift of discerning spirits; and what, as a rule, would be the use of — the gift of speaking with tongues — if the gift of interpreting them were wanting?
  • Lastly there remain the charismata that seem to have as object the administration of temporal affairs, amid works of charitygubernationes, opitulationes, distributiones. Judging by the context, these gifts, though conferred and useful for the direction and comfort of one’s neighbour, were in no way necessarily found in all ecclesiastical superiors.

The charismata, being extraordinary favours and not requisite for the sanctification of the individual, were not bestowed indiscriminately on all Christians. However, in the Apostolic Age, they were comparatively common, especially in the communities of Jerusalem, Rome, and Corinth. The reason of this is apparent: in the infant Churches the charismata were extremely useful, and even morally necessary, to strengthen the faith of believers, to confound the infidels, to make them reflect, and to counterbalance the false miracles with which they sometimes prevailed. St. Paul was careful (I Corinthians 12, 13, 14) to restrict authoritatively the use of these charismata within the ends for which they were bestowed, and thus insist upon their subordination to the power of the hierarchy. Cf. Batiffol, “L’Eglise naissante et le catholicisme” (Paris, 1909), 36. (See .)

Traditional Catholic Summer Ember Days

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Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday after Pentecost Sunday are Summer Ember days of fasting and abstinence.  They are known as “Whit Embertide”.

Prayers-before-the-HarvestPrayer Before Harvesting First Fruits

This Sunday is Pentecost Sunday.  So these days this year, (2015), begin this Wednesday, (May 27th), Friday, (May 29th) and Saturday, (May 30th).

Ember days of Wednesday and Saturday are fasting and partial abstinence, (I full meal WITH MEAT and 2 small meals WITHOUT MEAT).  Friday is fasting and abstinence, (I full meal and 2 small meals with NO MEAT).

Novena To Holy Spirit 8th Day

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holywaterfont

O SANCTE SPIRITUS, qui sollemni Pentecostes die repente per dispertitas linguas tamquam ignis in Apostolos descendens, intra cenaculum congregatos, ita eorum mentes illuminasti, eorum animos incendisti, eorumque voluntates roborasti, ut inde per universum mundum proficiscerentur et ubicumque animose fidenterque Iesu Christi doctrinam annuntiarent, eamque suo profuso cruore obsignarent, renova, quaesumus, in animas quoque nostras prodigiales gratiae tuae effusiones. O HOLY SPIRIT, who on the solemn day of Pentecost didst suddenly descend upon the Apostles gathered in the Upper Room in parted tongues as it were of fire and didst so enlighten their minds, inflame their hearts, and strengthen their wills, that henceforth they went through the entire world and courageously and confidently proclaimed everywhere the teaching of Christ and sealed it with the shedding of their blood, renew, we beseech Thee, the wondrous outpouring of Thy grace in our hearts also.
Quanta mentes nostrae ignorantia laborant circa naturam gravitatemque divinarum veritatum, quae obiectum fidei efficiunt, sine qua salutem nemini sperare licet. Quot aberrationes a iusta terrenorum bonorum aestimatione, quae saepius animae ipsimet anteponuntur. Quam saepe corda nostra non, ut debent, Creatoris amore palpitant, sed ignobiliter creaturarum cupidine. Quam saepe falso humani iudicii respectu impellimur, cum debemus Iesu Christi praecepta palam profiteri, eaque sincere et cum rerum etiam iactura in vitae usum deducere. Quanta infirmitas in amplectenda ferendaque sereno libentique animo huius vitae cruce, quae christianum solummodo potest divini Magistri sui discipulum dignum efficere. How grievously our minds are afflicted with ignorance concerning the nature and dignity of those divine truths which form the object of faith, without which no man may hope for salvation. How far men go astray from a just estimation of earthly goods, which too often are put before the soul itself. How often our hearts do not beat with love of the Creator as they ought, but rather with an ignoble lust for creatures. How often are we led by a false respect for human judgment, when we ought to profess openly the precepts of Jesus Christ and to reduce them to action with a sincere heart and with, if need be, of our worldly substance. What weakness we manifest in embracing and carrying with a serene and willing heart the crosses of this life, which alone can make the Christian a worthy follower of his divine Master.
O Sancte Spiritus, mentes nostras illumina, corda nostra purifica, voluntatesque nostra redintegra; ita quidem ut infinitum animae nostrae pretium plane cognoscamus, itemque peritura huius mundi bona pro nihilo habeamus; ut Deum supra res omnes adamemus, eiusque amore proximos, quemadmodum nosmetipsos, diligamus; ut fidem nostram non modo palam demonstrare ne timeamus, sed de eadem potius gloriemur; ut denique non tantum res prosperas sed res etiam adversas quasi de manu Domini accipiamus, confisi prorsus omnia Eum in eorum bonum esse conversurum, qui erga Eum amore ferantur. Fac, quaesumus, ut nos, suavibus gratiae tuae impulsionibus constanter respondentes ac perseveranti animo operantes bonum, amplissimam sempiternae gloriae messem aliquando accipere mereamur. Amen. O Holy Spirit, enlighten our minds, cleanse our hearts, and give new strength to our wills; to such a degree, at least, that we may clearly recognize the value of our soul, and in a like manner, despise the perishable goods of this world; that we may love God above all things, and, for the love of Him, our neighbor as ourselves; that we may not only be free from fear in professing our faith publicly, but rather may glory in it; finally, that we may accept not only prosperity but also adversity as from the hand of the Lord, with all confidence that He will turn all things into good for those who lovingly tend towards Him. Grant, we beseech Thee, that we, by constantly answering the sweet impulses of Thy grace and doing that which is good with a persevering heart, may deserve one day to receive the rich reward of glory everlasting. Amen.

Catholic Exorcism And Re-Consecrating Creation #4

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God’s plan for saving a damned world was to:Christ giving the keys of heave to St Peter_stained glass

  • Send His Divine Son Jesus Christ to take on human nature and sanctify it by being obedient to His Father’s will even unto death.  He destroyed the strong hold of the prince of this world, (the devil and his minions).  He conquered death by dying in His human body and rising again.
  • Send the Holy Spirit into His Apostles to sanctify them and send them to continue the same mission of Jesus Christ.  Apostle means ‘SENT’ as the Father ‘SENT’ Jesus to do His mission.
  • Sent the Holy Spirit to form His Church, which is the Body of Christ with Jesus as the head and we as His Body.
  • Use created matter, such as the human body of Mary which gave flesh to Jesus.

God uses Divine action, human persons, words and created matter to exorcise and re-sanctify the fallen world that is under the power of the devil.

  1. The first element is Jesus Christ, the divine-human Being, Who, through the action of His Spirit, vivifies and leavens the other elements of the act;
  2. the second element is man, with his marvelous powers of reason, sentiment, emotions, and capabilities to sense, hearing, voice, singing and speaking, motion and gestures;
  3. and the third element is irrational creation, bread, wine, water, oil, lights, incense, vestments, gold, bells, organ.’  Roman Ritual, Volume III, The Blessings, pg. vi.

God, man, words and created elements are all parts of how our salvation comes to us through the Holy Sacraments of the Catholic Church.Traditional Latin Mass_Jim 3

‘How Catholics should rejoice in the knowledge and realization that our salvation comes from God through the sacramental life, and, consequently, with what fervor and alacrity should we participate in the Eucharistic Sacrifice, the sacraments, the sacramental and prayer life of the Church!’ pg. vi.

By Christ’s incarnation, God wed creation to Himself.  Exorcised and consecrated people and things are married to the supernatural life of God, the spiritual.

‘Between the life of the Deity and the life of humanity lies the field of sacramental activity where Infinite and finite meet and are united. pg. vii.

We are so blessed to be traditional Catholics and to value God’s Divine actions work through His Holy Church.  Purgatory MassWe appreciate the office of the pope, the bishops, priests and deacons and their indispensable part of cooperating with God in bringing us the graces God wants to give us through the Holy Sacraments and prayers of the Church.  We appreciate this, in spite of the many modernistic teachings that many of them are wrongly teaching and supporting right now.

Filioque, Holy Spirit Proceeds From Father And (Filio) Son

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Trinity_pious picture2filiOQUE

Having treated of the part taken by the Son in the Procession of the Holy Ghost, we come next to consider the introduction of the expression, (Filioque), into the Creed of Constantinople. The author of the addition is unknown, but the first trace of it is found in Spain. This was successively introduced into the Symbol of the Council of Toledo in 447, then, in pursuance of an order of another synod held in the same place (589), it was inserted in the Niceno-Constantinopolitan Creed. Admitted likewise into the , it began to appear in France in the eighth century. It was chanted in 767, in Charlemagne’s chapel at Gentilly, where it was heard by ambassadors from Constantine Copronymnus. The Greeks were astonished and protested, explanations were given by the Latins, and many discussions followed. The Archbishop of Aquileia, Paulinus, defended the addition at the Council of Friuli, in 796. It was afterwards accepted by a council held at Aachen, in 809. However, as it proved a stumbling-block to the Greeks Pope Leo III disapproved of it; and, though he entirely agreed with the Franks on the question of the doctrine, he advised them to omit the new word. He himself caused two large silver tablets, on which the creed with the disputed expression omitted was engraved to be erected in St. Peter’s. His advice was unheeded by the Franks; and, as the conduct and schism of Photius seemed to justify the Westerns in paying no more regard to the feelings of the Greeks, the addition of the words was accepted by the Roman Church under Benedict VIII (cf. Funk, “Kirchengeschichte”, Paderborn, 1902, p. 243).

shield_trinityThe Greeks have always blamed the Latins for making the addition. They considered that, quite apart from the question of doctrine involved by the expression, the insertion was made in violation of a decree of the Council of Ephesus, forbidding anyone “to produce, write, or compose a confession of faith other than the one defined by the Fathers of Nicæa”. Such a reason will not bear examination. Supposing the truth of the dogma (established above), it is inadmissible that the Church could or would have deprived herself of the right to mention it in the symbol. If the opinion be adhered to, and it has strong arguments to support it, which considers that the developments of the Creed in what concerns the Holy Ghost were approved by the Council of Constantinople (381), at once it might be laid down that the bishops at Ephesus (431) certainly did not think of condemning or blaming those of Constantinople. But, from the fact that the disputed expression was authorized by the Council of Chalcedon, in 451, we conclude that the prohibition of the Council of Ephesus was never understood, and ought not to be understood, in an absolute sense. It may be considered either as a doctrinal, or as a merely disciplinary pronouncement. In the first case it would exclude any addition or modification opposed to, or at variance with, the deposit of Revelation; and such seems to be its historic import, for it was proposed and accepted by the Fathers to oppose a formula tainted with Nestorianism. In the second case considered as a disciplinary measure, it can bind only those who are not the depositaries of the supreme power in the Church. The latter, as it is their duty to teach the revealed truth and to preserve it from error, possess, by Divine authority, the power and right to draw up and propose to the faithful such confessions of faith as circumstances may demand. This right is as unconfinable as it is inalienable.  1914 Catholic Encyclopedia